M. FORD CREECH ANTIQUES & FINE ARTS
 

 

RARE EARLY GEORGE III PIERCED SILVER SERVING TROWEL

Thomas Nash, London, 1765

 

 

 

Extremely decorative and rare triangular cast and pierced trowel-form server,

the slightly curved blade with complex scrolling and interlaced foliate openwork,

within a bright-cut gadrooned pattern edge, joined by a central acanthus leaf to a slightly arched

corresponding bright-cut gadrooned shaft ending in further interlaced foliate openwork at the terminal,

 the blade verso crested with a squirrel sejant cracking a nut, and

Gadsby and No 1 (Fairbairns 135.7 – Amcot, Barrow, Gilbert, Lee et al);

 made for varied uses, including fish, cakes and pudding

  

Condition : Excellent with very crisp marks

 

Ref : A similar trowel appears in, "Antique Silver Servers for the Dining Table,"

 B.S. Rabinovitch, pp. 66, 67;

also see Peter Waldon, Price Guide to Antique Silver, p. 247, pl. 785

 

11.5” Long x  4.15” Wide (Blade) / 4.8 oz.

 

SOLD  

 

#6591

 

Please Inquire

 

 

 

          

 

 


 

Also See :

 

 

George III Pierced Silver Server / Slice

Richard Mills, 1770, the blade centering three crested Jaybirds

 

For related silver serving pieces, please click below:

 

George III Pierced Silver Serving Trowel

Victorian Silver Cheese Scoop

Edward VII Silver Gilt Past Server

 


 

 

We welcome and encourage all inquiries.  We will make every attempt to answer any questions you might have..

 

 For information, call (901) 761-1163 or (901) 827-4668, or

Email : mfcreech@bellsouth.net or  mfordcreech@gmail.com

 

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M. Ford Creech Antiques & Fine Arts / 581 South Perkins Road /  Memphis, TN 38117 / USA /  Wed.-Sat. 11-6, or by appointment

 


 

 

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Rare Early George III Silver Pierced Serving Trowel, crested, a squirrel cracking a nut, 1765